Is Rolfing a form of massage?

Why do we reccomend ten sessions?

What does a Rolfer do in a session?

What areas do you work on in each of the sessions?

May I try one session to see if I like it?

What do I wear?

What does Rolfing feel like? I’ve heard it hurts.

Only my right knee hurts. Can you just work on the knee?

Why do humans get out of balance?

Can I get the same benefits by going to the gym or doing yoga?

Can Rolfing actually change a person’s shape?

How much can Rolfing change a persons’ body?

Does everyone get the same results?

Are the changes through Rolfing documented?

Can people have emotional releases while being Rolfed?

How often should I come?

I’m an athlete. When should I go through Rolfing?

I don’t have any major problems. Can I still benefit?

Is there anything I should do or avoid while undergoing Rolfing?

 

 

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Is Rolfing a form of massage?

No. Massage is designed to stimulate blood and lymph flow, relax tight muscles and increase range of motion. Rolfing, on the other hand, works with the myofascial elements of the musculoskeletal system to improve posture, balance and overall efficiency of movement. Although both employ touch, the similarity ends there.

 

Why do we reccomend ten sessions?

Rolfing assesses the whole body instead of chasing after symptoms. The ten-session format provides a framework in which each part of the body is individually addressed and then integrated with the work of the previous sessions to achieve an overall lasting result.

 

What does a Rolfer do in a session?

A Rolfer applies pressure using his or her hands, fingers, knuckles, and occasionally an elbow to release adhesions that have developed in the body’s soft tissues as a result of trauma, injury, misuse and bad habits. By freeing these restrictions in a refined, systematic manner, a Rolfer guides the body back into a state of improved alignment and functionality.

 

What areas do you work on in each of the sessions?

For a more detailed description, please see my booklet, Rolfing and You. Very briefly, the first session addresses the ribcage, armpit region, sides of the legs, and back. Session two works from the knees down and ends with more focused back work. The third session focuses on the lateral aspect (sides) of the torso. The fourth, the insides of the legs. The fifth, the stomach muscles and hip flexors. The sixth; buttocks, lateral rotators, hamstrings, calves and lower back. The seventh; thoracic outlet, neck, face & skull. Sessions 8, 9 and 10 unify this work.

 

May I try one session to see if I like it?

Yes. I recommend it. In fact, you could do the first three without any negative consequences. After that, the work begins focusing on deeper muscle groups and core movement patterns. At this point you should follow the program through to the end.

 

What do I wear?

Please see the Appointments page for more information.

 

What does Rolfing feel like? I’ve heard it hurts.

Sometimes Rolfing may feel similar to having a tight muscle massaged. At others, it may feel relaxing and liberating. I will adjust the work to fit within your comfort zone. Like many aspects of life, communication is key; the greater the communication, the better the results.

 

Only my right knee hurts. Can you just work on the knee?

This may seem reasonable at first, but pain is often a poor indicator of where the actual problem lies. You could liken this to unplugging a warning light that is flashing on the dashboard of your car. The warning light is simply alerting you to a more serious problem and not the problem itself. Once you begin to understand the interconnected and far-reaching effects of the body’s soft tissue matrices, you will begin to appreciate the importance of addressing the body as a single unit. This expanded understanding of body mechanics is precisely why Rolfing gets results when other disciplines do not.

 

Why do humans get out of balance?

One of the most striking features of the human structure is that we are the only living creatures that carry all of our weight-bearing segments (head, torso, hips, and legs) in a single, vertical line. Ergonomically, this is a very efficient model, but it also means that when one part goes out of balance, the resultant strain is passed on throughout the rest of our structure. For us to function properly, our body segments must all work together harmoniously and the better our alignment the better we can function.

 

Can I get the same benefits by going to the gym or doing yoga?

If you are not getting regular exercise, exercising will benefit your overall health, but in so doing, you may also be subconsciously reinforcing the imbalances that already exist in your body. Most of these imbalances are impossible for us to detect and correct because we’ve had them so long they feel “natural” to us. Changing these patterns requires not only precise and purposeful myofascial release, but also reeducating the individual as to the correct way to use the body. This is the scope and purpose of Rolfing.

 

Can Rolfing actually change a person’s shape?

Yes. The physical changes in the body affected through Rolfing have been fairly well documented in research studies.

 

How much can Rolfing change a persons’ body?

Rolfing cannot correct deeply ingrained traits such as idiopathic scoliosis once it has been established, relaxed arches, or anatomical leg imbalances. However, a person with these conditions can still improve their functioning through Rolfing greatly. How much change is affected will depend on a wide variety of factors, but the results for many is often dramatic.

 

Does everyone get the same results?

Everyone will benefit from Rolfing, but not to the same degree. Mental attitude, age, genetic traits and other factors can influence the results greatly. Like every aspect of existence, human bodies fall collectively into a bell curve, so if you are like most people you should benefit significantly.

 

Are the changes through Rolfing documented?

Research projects at UCLA and the University of Maryland, have identified measurable changes in neuromuscular functioning through Rolfing. Further, these changes have been proven to be very long, spanning many years.

 

Can people have emotional releases while being Rolfed?

Some forms of trauma to the body carry an emotional as well as physical component. Thus, in the process of releasing areas of strain, a person may experience emotions and/or memories related to a specific incident or incidents. These are rare and not germane to the goal of Rolfing, but they can happen. The Rolf Institute selects for training those candidates who possess the sensitivity and understanding to deal with such matters, should they arise.

 

How often should I come?

Once a week is the preferred interval.

 

I’m an athlete. When should I go through Rolfing?

Unlike a massage, which you may want to do before or after a sports event, Rolfing is best done off-season when less demands are placed on the body. The reason is simple. Rolfing affects your structure and movement patterns and it takes the body time to adapt to these changes.

 

I don’t have any major problems. Can I still benefit?

Athletes, dancers, musicians and others who want to improve their performance usually find Rolfing very beneficial, but many people come simply to correct old habits and feel better. By resolving misaligned connective tissues, you are effectively returning the body to a more youthful, vital state and this is something almost anyone would enjoy.

 

Is there anything I should do or avoid while undergoing Rolfing?

Common sense applies. The basic rule is “Don’t push it.” Despite how much better you may feel, give your body time to adjust to the changes. Avoid intense physical activity or trying anything new until you understand the changes and how your new body feels and functions

 

 Orange County

Rolfing

We often look at the human body a
collection of individual parts: heart, eyes, feet, etc. But from a functional standpoint, it operates as a single, dynamic whole: when one part of the body becomes compromised, the entire structure is affected.


-  James Bardot

Office Hours:   Monday-Friday 8:30am - 6:00pm

Phone:           949.388.2357 (Office/Fax)

Email:            james@rolfingorangecounty.com

Address:        29391 Crown Ridge
                     Laguna Niguel, CA 92677

Website:        www.RolfingOrangeCounty.com

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